6/30/2015

Developing software for safety-critical systems? Have I got a book for you

Chris Hobbs is the only person I know who holds a math degree with a specialization in mathematical philosophy. In fact, before I met him, I didn’t know such a thing even existed. But guess what? That’s one of the things I really like about Chris. The more I hang out with him, the more I learn.

Come to think of it, helping people learn has become something of a specialty for Chris. He is, for example, a flying instructor and the author of Flying Beyond: The Canadian Commercial Pilot Textbook. And, as a software safety specialist at QNX Software Systems, he regularly provides advice to customers building systems that must comply with functional safety standards like IEC 61508, EN 5012x, and ISO 26262.

Chris has already written a number of papers on software safety, some of which I have had the great privilege to edit. You can find several of them on the QNX website. But recently, Chris upped the ante and wrote an entire book on the subject, titled Embedded Software Development for Safety-Critical Systems. The book:

  • covers the development of safety-critical systems under ISO 26262, IEC 61508, EN 50128, and IEC 62304
  • helps readers understand and apply remarkably esoteric development practices and be prepared to justify their work to external auditors
  • discusses the advantages and disadvantages of architectural and design practices recommended in the standards, including replication and diversification, anomaly detection, and so-called “safety bag” systems
  • examines the use of open-source components in safety-critical systems

I haven’t yet had a chance to review the book, but at 358 pages, it promises to be a substantial read.

Interested? Well, you can’t get the book just yet. But you can pre-order it today and get one of the first copies off the press. It’s scheduled for release September 1.

A version of this post appeared in the QNX Auto Blog.

1 comment:

https://plus.google.com/u/7/117424392371430540915/posts said...

Hello, I read ba bad news about a car infotainment System suspected to be a QNX on this link

http://www.wired.com/2015/07/hackers-remotely-kill-jeep-highway/?mbid=social_twitter

In this case, does this Jeep Cherokee is using QNX or an Apple car infotainment system.
If Fiat Jeep Cherokee is not using QNX you have to alert N4BB not to mislead their readers.
Best regard M.Arseneault.